Alleged Contract Scam: Group accuses Fubara of raising false alarm

… Says displaying 5% retention fee as fraud is the height of ignorance By Chris Udochukwu In a desperate bid to rubbish his predecessor, Rivers State State Governor Siminalayi Fubara’s propaganda machinery shot itself in the leg displaying five percent retention fee as fraud in a letter that emanated from his office. This was revealed in a statement issued and signed by the convener of Concerned Rivers Citizens CRC, Emmanuel Chibuzor on Friday. The group said: ” This is the first time where correspondence stamped at the Governors office and sent directly to the Governor is released to be used for unintelligent deception and social media hype laced with deliberate falsehood. “Whoever released that letter is either brimming with ignorance or banking on the silence of those that know better. “The letter clearly states the money in discussion is money held for “retention” nothing else. “Retention is 5% of the contract sum kept by the Government for a period, it is released at the expiration of the defect liability period of a project and is done for ALL projects. “The …

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Nigeria’s Economic Apartheid in Electricity Consumption by Farooq A. Kperogi

I am writing this week’s column from Nelson Mandela University in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, where I have come to deliver a talk on media theory. But this column isn’t about the talk or about South Africa. It’s about the enduring problems of electricity generation and distribution in Nigeria, which I have brooded over for quite some time. It’s ironic that I am writing about Nigeria’s new economic apartheid in electricity consumption from the previous land of apartheid where electricity is a human right, where even the poorest of the poor “have a public law right to receive electricity” even before the abolishment of apartheid, according to F. Dube and C.G. Moyo in their 2022 article titled “The Right to Electricity in South Africa.” I’m not sure there’s any modern country on earth where electricity is as precarious, as insufficient, as unreliable, and as socially stratified as it is in Nigeria. The hierarchization of electricity distribution into “bands” in which people classified as “band A” (read: the wealthy) get the most electricity and people classified as “Band E” (read: the …

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